Monday, 29 August 2016

Hayley Stevens - A Sceptics Guide to Ghost Hunting

7.45pm Thursday 27 October 2016
£4 / £2 concessions (Advance tickets)

The Bell, 50 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EX.
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East

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Learn all about the world of modern paranormal research and why things aren't always what it seems when it comes to things that go bump in the night. Do people really fake ghosts to get a new council house? Is belief in ghosts rising? What's the deal with all this ghost hunting technology? Learn all of this and more.

Described as ' ... the Scully end of the Mulder-Scully X Files spectrum' by The Times, Hayley Stevens is a paranormal researcher who uses rational inquiry to investigate strange phenomena. She has been investigating ghost cases for over a decade - since her teens. Her writing can be found on her award-willing blog, Hayley Is A Ghost, as well as in Skeptical Inquirer, Skeptic Magazine, Paranormal Magazine and more. Hayley regularly speaks across Europe about investigating the paranormal.

7.45pm Thursday 27 October 2016
£4 / £2 concessions (
Advance tickets)
The Bell, 50 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EX.
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East

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Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Phil Hine - A Phallic (K)night

£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Monday 24 October 2016
7.30pm

Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn

Directions
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In 1786 Richard Payne Knight - collector, arbiter of taste, and gentleman scholar published "A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus" - the first book to propose that all mythology and religion (including Christianity) is derived from primitive fertility cults.

In such cults, he asserted, the male and female genitalia symbolise procreative power, and the primal life force is worshipped through this seemingly obscene imagery. "Priapus" caused scandal in the eighteenth century, but cast an influence that is still with us today - from psychoanalysis to contemporary paganism.


(This is not Phil Hine.)
In this talk, Phil Hine examines the life of Richard Payne Knight. the key themes of "A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus" and its republication in the nineteenth century as both erotic and ethnographic text.

Phil Hine is an independent researcher and occult practitioner, he has been writing and lecturing on esoteric themes and practices for over thirty years.

£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Monday 24 October 2016
7.30pm

Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn

Directions
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Sunday, 21 August 2016

The Death of Gregory Akerman

7.45pm Thursday 29 September 2016
£4 / £2 concessions (Advance tickets)
The Bell, 50 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EX.
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East
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"Professional troublemaker hassles psychics to unlock death's mysteries."

The Death of Gregory Akerman sees the eponymous Gregory explore his obsession with death along with the importance of deadlines in his life. If Gregory can work out when he'll die, perhaps this information will spur him on to actually achieving something.

Gregory enjoys learning, befriending fringe groups (Heaven's Gate [how?], the Swedenborg Society, Vatican etc) and having adventures. A professional trouble maker, Gregory wants to share his stories with you.

7.45pm Thursday 29 September 2016
£4 / £2 concessions (Advance tickets)
The Bell, 50 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EX.
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East
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Saturday, 20 August 2016

From the Shadows: The Architecture and Afterlife of Nicholas Hawksmoor

£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Wednesday 14 September 2016
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn

Directions
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Nicholas Hawksmoor (1662–1736) is considered one of Britain’s greatest architects. He was involved in the grandest architectural projects of his age and today is best known for his London churches – six idiosyncratic edifices of white Portland stone that remain standing today, proud and tall in the otherwise radically changed cityscape.

After centuries of neglect Hawksmoor began to return to prominence during the 1960s and 1970s. At the same time, a mythology began to develop around him and his work. Iain Sinclair posited a magical "system of energies, or unit of connection, within the city," in Hawksmoor’s churches in Lud Heat (1975), while Peter Ackroyd popularised the association of Hawksmoor’s work with the occult in his novel Hawksmoor (1985).

Latterly, psycho-geographers, Alan Moore and others have continued the myth of Hawksmoor as an undercover pagan architect. In this talk, Owen Hopkins explores how and why this mythology has grown up around Hawksmoor and his work and how it relates to the real historical figure.

Owen Hopkins is a writer, historian and curator of architecture. He is Architecture Programme Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts and is author of four books on architecture, including From the Shadows: The Architecture and Afterlife of Nicholas Hawksmoor.

£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Wednesday 14 September 2016
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn.

Directions
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Thursday, 4 August 2016

Charles Fort's 142nd Birthday (and our 5th)

The naïve and the pedantic and the bizarre and the grotesque and the sincere and the insincere, the profound and the puerile.
Charles Fort - The Book of the Damned
 
A gathering to celebrate the 142nd birthday of Charles Fort, the american writer who inspired the idea of being fortean. (Also the fifth birthday of the London Fortean Society but that's not so important.)
 
Beginning at 7pm on Wednesday 6 August outside 39A Marchmont Street London WC1N 1AP, Fort’s home in London, with a reading and toast (ale and cheese optional). This will be followed by a drink in his honour at the nearby Marquis Cornwallis on Marchmont Street, a Bloomsbury pub of grandiose proportions.
 
All forteans and friends welcome.

 

 
I am a collector of notes upon subjects that have diversity—such as deviations from concentricity in the lunar crater Copernicus, and a sudden appearance of purple Englishmen—stationary meteor-radiants, and a reported growth of hair on the bald head of a mummy—and "Did the girl swallow the octopus?
Charles Fort - Wild Talents

Monday, 13 June 2016

A History of Life After Death



£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Tuesday 26 July 2016
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn.
Directions
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The end of life has never meant the extinction of hope. Throughout history people have yearned for, and often been terrified by, continuance beyond the horizon of mortality.

In his unique new book, Philip C. Almond examines the history of ideas surrounding life after death. Ranging from the banks of the river Styx to the legendary Isles of the Blessed and from Dante’s Inferno to the fusion of Heavenly and Hellish worlds in the fantasy creations of twentieth century literature, this talk will provide an illuminating journey of the hereafter as imagined in literature, philosophy and religion throughout the centuries.


Philip C. Almond is Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences (Research) and Professorial Research Fellow at the Centre for the History of European Discourses at The University of Queensland. He is the author of many books, including  The Devil: A New Biography and Afterlife: A History of Life after Death, both from Cornell; The Lancashire Witches: A Chronicle of Sorcery and Death on Pendle Hill; Adam and Eve in Seventeenth-Century Thought; and Heaven and Hell in Enlightenment England

£5 plus booking fee (Advance tickets)
Tuesday 26 July 2016
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn.
Directions
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We spend more time there than we do here....

Monday, 6 June 2016

The Cock Lane Ghost: A London Ghost Story

7.45pm Thursday 30 June 2016
£4 / £2 concessions
Please pay on the door
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East
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In 1762 the ghost of a murder victim appeared to be haunting a little girl in Smithfield; Scratching Fanny of Cock Lane attracted mobs of curious onlookers outside the house, a visit from the heir to the throne, an investigation by Dr Johnson and finally a lawsuit.

The Cock Lane ghost was the world’s first example of a media circus, and it arose from a spirit of anarchy and disruptiveness quite specific to this ancient area of London. Was the Cock Lane Ghost simply a pub joke that went wrong? Some new research may shed light on this famous ghost story.

Roger Clarke's book A Natural History of Ghosts has most recently been published in Spain. Japanese publication is this July, and the mass-market paperback in the USA over Halloween after a rave review in The New York Times.

7.45pm Thursday 30 June 2016
£4 / £2 concessions
Please pay on the door
The Pipeline, 94 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EZ.
Train and Tube: Liverpool Street. Tube: Aldgate, Aldgate East
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